ALASKA CONSTITUTIONAL CONVENTION

February 5, 1956

SEVENTY-FIFTH DAY

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Convention will come to order (2:00 p.m.). The Reverend John Stokes, would you come forward please and give the invocation.

REVEREND STOKES: Let us pray. Almighty God and Father of all mankind, Thou who doth sit upon the throne of righteousness and dost deal justly with all men, we invoke Thy divine blessing upon this, the signing of the Constitution of the State of Alaska. In doing so, with thanksgiving for those who have prepared it, it is our earnest plea that Thou wilt use it in the affairs of the citizens of this State in the years and ages to come; through Jesus Christ, our Lord. Amen.

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Chief Clerk will call the roll.

(The Chief Clerk called the roll at this time.)

CHIEF CLERK: 1 absent.

PRESIDENT EGAN: A quorum is present. The Convention will proceed with its regular order of business. The Chief Clerk will please read the communications that are before us.

CHIEF CLERK: Telegram from Delegate E. L. Bartlett: "The seventy-five days which began on November 8 and conclude now will become as meaningful in Alaska's future chronicles as they are now to each of you personally. When the Convention began. it was with the best wishes of all Alaskans. As time passed, there was growing comprehension of the immensity of the task upon which you had started. Today, when you sign the document which you have fashioned, there is, I believe, general understanding not only that you have worked diligently, faithfully, and with civic virtue, but also successfully, in writing a Constitution dedicated to the best American principles and to the furtherance of the mighty state to be. I thank you for extending the invitation to be with you today as the Constitution is signed. For both Mrs. Bartlett and me, it is as hard as can be to be here when we want to be there. We congratulate you for a job well done. You have earned the grateful thanks of your fellow Alaskans. Our congratulations go likewise to the loyal members of your staff whose assistance I know has meant so much to you all during the Convention."

PRESIDENT EGAN: We are delighted that we have so many distinguished guests with us as spectators today. There is one though whom we know each individual present is extremely happy to welcome. Let me present to you Mr. Benny Benson, a Native Alaskan, who as a young boy designed Alaska's Flag. Benny, would you stand, please.

(Mr. Benson stood, and audience stood and applauded.)

At this time I take great pleasure in asking that Mr. Buckalew, Mr. Johnson, Mr. King, and Mr. Reader escort the Governor of Alaska, the Honorable B. Frank Heintzleman, to the rostrum.

(The gentlemen escorted Governor Heintzleman to the

rostrum at this time.) (Standing ovation)

PRESIDENT EGAN: Governor Heintzleman, we are extremely gratified that you are here with us today. We know that through your long years in Alaska you have, probably as well as any one in Alaska, comprehended what this day means to our future. Governor, we are again happy to present you to the people who are present today.

(The full text of the speech given by Governor Heintzleman

will be found in the appendix.)

(Standing ovation)

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Convention will come to order. As you know, when we adjourned last night the previous question had been ordered. We now have before us the proposed Constitution for the State of Alaska in its final form. The question is: "Shall the proposed Constitution for the State of Alaska be agreed upon by the Convention?" The Chief Clerk will call the roll.

(The Chief Clerk called the roll with the following result:

Yeas: 54 - Armstrong, Awes, Barr, Boswell, Buckalew, Coghill, Collins, Cooper, Cross, Davis, Doogan, Emberg, H. Fischer, V. Fischer, Gray, Harris, Hellenthal, Hermann, Hilscher, Hinckel, Hurley, Johnson, Kilcher, King, Knight, Laws, Lee, Londborg, McCutcheon, McLaughlin, McNealy, McNees, Marston, Metcalf, Nerland, Nolan, Nordale, Peratrovich, Poulsen, Reader, Riley, R. Rivers, V. Rivers, Rosswog, Smith, Stewart, Sundborg, Sweeney, Taylor, VanderLeest, Walsh, White, Wien, and Mr. President.

Nays: 0 -

Absent: 1 - Robertson.)

CHIEF CLERK: 54 Yeas, and 1 absent.

PRESIDENT EGAN: The "Yeas" have it and the proposed Constitution for the State of Alaska has been agreed upon by the Convention. We will now have the signing of the Constitution. The Chief Clerk will call the roll and as each delegate's name is called, that delegate may come forward and affix his or her signature to the Constitution.

(The Chief Clerk called the roll and each delegate and

the Secretary came forward and signed the Constitution as his or her name was called.)

PRESIDENT EGAN: So the proposed Constitution for the State of Alaska in its final form has been signed by the delegates and the Secretary. The Chair would like to at this time call on our own Reverend R. Rolland Armstrong to give our prayer of dedication. Reverend Armstrong.

REVEREND ARMSTRONG: Let us be thankful to Almighty God. Almighty Father, Lover of men, we thank Thee for creating us after Thine image. Thou hast breathed into us the breath of life. Our souls are Thine. We are wholly Thine. Thou has ordained that the delegates of this Convention should be assembled to write a charter of life for Alaska. We bow in humble reverence, for this task has been great, and we have constantly realized the importance of our actions before Thee. Nothing less than a miracle from Thee has kept us together in mind and spirit. We have, under Thy guidance, acted as many facets of thought and passion to mold this one document. The anvil has rung with the hammer of compromise, and there has come forth a statement of our belief. Today we place the work of our hands before Thee. We ask Thy blessing as we dedicate this Constitution. We set it apart from any other plan ever ordered in Alaska as the foundation of our State. We ask that it may speak our hearts, that it might find favor before Thee and the people of this "Great Land." The days and nights have been long. The strain has been at times almost too great to bear, but Thy sustaining power has given us strength. We thank Thee for Thy hand of love, the everlasting arms that have kept us within Thy will. Father, we dedicate this document, mindful of the one who has been given to us as our President. We thank Thee for him. We thank Thee for his wisdom; it has been wisdom from above. We cherish his undaunted courage, the courage he has displayed before us as delegates. We thank Thee for him. And now, O Father, Lord of all, within these pages of this Constitution, we pray that the weak might find strength, the name of justice might be upheld, the lands might be preserved, the governed might find liberty, the life of all might be made bearable and workable. We send this statement of faith unto our people, dedicated in Thy presence. Do Thou sanctify it by Thy grace. In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit, Amen.

RILEY: Mr. President, in order that the Convention and its guests may hear an address from the President at this time, I ask that the Chair be relinquished to one of the Vice Presidents. I ask unanimous consent.

PRESIDENT EGAN: If there is no objection. Mr. Peratrovich, will you take the chair, please?

(First Vice President Peratrovich took the chair at this

time. The full text of the speech given by President Egan will be found in the appendix.)

PRESIDENT EGAN: "Alaska's Flag" will be sung by the Ladd Choral Group.

("Alaska's Flag" was sung at this time.)

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Chair would like to request that the Most Reverend Francis D. Gleeson come forward and deliver the benediction.

THE MOST REVEREND FRANCIS D. GLEESON, S.J.,: Almighty God, our Father in Heaven, Master and Ruler of the universe, Who has planted deep in the spirit of man an abiding hunger for freedom and justice, we humbly pray that the long wished-for day may soon dawn when our beloved Northland may be recognized as an equal among the states of our Nation. Deign, this day, to bless with Thy divine approval the instrument of government devised by the long and dedicated labors of our chosen representatives. Grant to all who now dwell or shall ever dwell under its protecting mantle the generosity to spend themselves freely, the determination to work together harmoniously, the intelligence to promote wisely the peace and the prosperity and the glory of our State.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mrs. Wien.

WIEN: I move and ask unanimous consent that the Convention recess to the call of the Chair.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mrs. Wien moves and asks unanimous consent that the Convention stand at recess subject to the call of the Chair. Is there objection? Hearing no objection, it is so ordered and the Convention stands at recess.

RECESS

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Convention will come to order. The Chief Clerk will call the roll.

(The Chief Clerk called the roll.)

CHIEF CLERK: Everybody is here.

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Chair has been informed that some lady left her purse back on the table where the photographs are. Mr. Johnson.

JOHNSON: Mr. President, I move that the invocation given by Reverend Stokes, the address by Governor Heintzleman, the prayer of dedication by Delegate Armstrong, the address by the President of the Convention, and the benediction by Bishop Gleason be spread upon the Journal of today's plenary session, and I ask unanimous consent.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Buckalew.

BUCKALEW: Mr. President, would you include Delegate Bartlett's wire in the motion?

JOHNSON: I would be very happy to.

PRESIDENT EGAN: You have heard the unanimous consent request of Mr. Johnson. Is there objection? Hearing no objection, it is so ordered. Mr. Marston.

MARSTON: Mr. President, where could I get the speech by our President today? I think it is delightful, very thoughtful.

PRESIDENT EGAN: It will be in the Journal. The Chair at this time would like to bring to the attention of the delegates the fact that this lamp that is on the Chief Clerk's desk at the present time is something really special. It is made of Alaska jade, gold, and silver. There is nothing like it in existence. Mr. Marston had that made for himself and his wife, and it is something really fine. Mr. Stewart, would you like to explain to the Convention how you believe we should proceed with the signing of these documents?

SECRETARY: I think the safest way to get the signatures on properly is to lay the documents out, one in each place, and then for the delegates to move along in the chairs, signing exactly the same place as they did before. One caution -- there is a blotter like this for each document so after you sign it, it should be moved down to protect the sheet because if perspiration gets on this parchment, you can no longer write on it, so be careful not to put hands on the signatures or your hand on the document otherwise. If you pass them out, we can get it started. Number one would be where Mr. Kilcher is, and down the line that way, back this way, and then down this way to the end. Start alphabetically. There is one other piece of parchment which is the parchment for the handwritten copy that will be laid here, and you can sign it with the others.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Coghill.

COGHILL: It seems that the proper way to do would be to have the Convention be at ease and to have all the delegates leave their seats and retire to the rear of the plenary hall, and as the roll is called, they will take their position, like "A", Armstrong will take position number one, and start signing, and then come on down.

PRESIDENT EGAN: If there is no objection, that is the manner in which we will proceed. The Convention will be at ease and the delegates will line up in accordance with the roll sheet.

(The Convention was at ease while the delegates signed the

parchment copies of the Constitution.)

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Convention will come to order. The Chair would like to announce that it is the intention to keep the copies that you have just signed here and distribute them in the morning. The Convention will come to order. Mr. Doogan.

DOOGAN: Mr. President, I would like today's Journal to show that we had a representative of the Governor of the State of Louisiana present at the signing ceremony, Mr. Kimbrough Owen.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Doogan asks unanimous consent that the record show that Mr. Kimbrough Owen was present at the signing ceremonies and represented the Governor of Louisiana. If there is no objection, it is so ordered. Mr. Marston.

MARSTON: Mr. President, I think we should show the story of the man and his wife who came all the way from Grand Rapids, Michigan, to see Mr. VanderLeest sign this document. I think it is the farthest individual trip made.

PRESIDENT EGAN: What were the names? Mr. VanderLeest.

VANDERLEEST: I will go in and bring him out, and let him do his own talking.

PRESIDENT EGAN: If there is no objection, Mr. VanderLeest, you might get Mr. Middleton, and offer him the privilege of the floor for a moment or two. The Convention will come to order.

(Mr. Louis Middleton came into the Convention hall.)

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Middleton, we are happy to have you with us and if you would like to make a few brief remarks, we would be happy to hear them.

MIDDLETON: I have had such a good time, Mr. President, I would like to. Mr. President, and members of the Constitutional Convention, it was quite an honor, I think, when I was invited to come up to this gathering just as an onlooker, not as a talker. Herman [VanderLeest] has been a friend of mine for over 50 years and he has never lost a chance to come and see me when he could, and he has sent me little souvenirs of this Convention and I appreciate it. When I got the card I didn't look at it as a common ordinary card. I looked at it as an invitation to come to a convention that we would never have the opportunity of witnessing again in America itself. We may have some island or group of islands adopt a constitution to become a state, but this is the last chance we have to have some territory on the mainland to aspire to becoming a state, and 1 know that it has got to go through. The reason it appeals to me -- I think that Michigan and Alaska follow the same trend in one way -- the State of Alaska has had this historical event of "54-40 or fight", and the State of Alaska has held the line. The State of Michigan also has the "Toledo War", and we lost out. The government -- or the powers that be at that time -- persuaded the State of Michigan to accept the upper peninsula in place of our valuable territory that was laying in the southern part, and it was a very poor trade at that time, but things have come up so it hasn't been so poor. Then we followed along an equal path the same as the State of Alaska. The State of Alaska was called "Seward's Icebox", and it was considered quite a place of wide open spaces and for big game hunting, and that was about all until the gold rush came. After the gold rush, the people that went to Alaska to get involved in that gold rush aspired to have nice homes, big farms, nice mercantile institutions and factories, and so they progressed to a wonderful degree. The State of Michigan had the same thing happen with our upper peninsula. Our upper peninsula was a place that God forgot, everybody thought, except when fall came and you could go up there deer hunting, until finally they found mineral deposits up there. The mineral deposits caused people to want to come to Michigan and to come to northern Michigan, and we have people aspiring to better things just like they have in Alaska, until now we are going to have the longest bridge in the world, reaching from northern Michigan to Michigan proper. Michigan, you know, is the only state in the Union where a portion of the people had to go through three other states to attend the meetings of the legislature in the wintertime. They did it. The people from northern Michigan had to go through Wisconsin, Illinois, and Ohio to get to Lansing. Now, there is only one thing that I Just hope about this analogy between Michigan and Alaska is that, Michigan had a sad experience when they applied for statehood. They were put off about two or three years. Now, I just hope that doesn't happen with the State of Alaska. I hope that it just goes through and parliamentary rules are suspended and the chairman invokes the entire vote of the assembly for the question on the floor. I have one good friend in Congress -- Jerry Ford [Gerald H. Ford, Jr.]. Jerry Ford is quite a businesslike man. He is practical in every sense of the word. He is hard as nails when anything comes up for finances, but he is a good honest Congressman; and I have another one there -- Senator Potter. Senator Potter and Jerry Ford helped me get these two stamps through, and I would be very glad if you like to mention this fine entertainment I have received up here, and at the same time, I am going to assure you that it isn't going to do you a bit of good because I think the fellows are for it anyway. (Applause) Thank you for allowing this time and I don't want to impose on you people any longer.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Thank you, Mr. Middleton. (Applause) The Convention will come to order. Mr. Coghill.

COGHILL: Mr. President, may we revert to the order of introduction of resolutions?

PRESIDENT EGAN: If there is no objection, Mr. Coghill, we will revert to the order of introduction of resolutions.

COGHILL: I have three resolutions on the Chief Clerk's desk.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Will the Chief Clerk please read the first resolution?

CHIEF CLERK: In full?

PRESIDENT EGAN: In full. It can be treated as a motion.

(The Chief Clerk then read the resolution by the Committee

on Administration, entitled "Immediate Statehood".)

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Coghill.

COGHILL: Mr. President, I move and ask unanimous consent that the rules be suspended and that this resolution be adopted.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Coghill moves and asks unanimous consent that the resolution be adopted. Is there objection? Mr. McNees.

McNEES: Mr. President, wouldn't it be possible to amend this so it would get a wider distribution than just to the two Speakers and the President? Perhaps every Congressman might receive one to good advantage.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Coghill.

COGHILL: I have no objection.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Do you have an amendment to offer, Mr. McNees, to the resolution?

McNEES: I would like to move that copies of this resolution go to each Congressman in both the Senate and House of Representatives.

PRESIDENT EGAN: First, if we are going to have a change by your motion -- a resolution can be adopted as a regular motion, Mr. Coghill. So you move that the resolution be adopted?

McNEES: Yes, I so move.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Is there a second?

R. RIVERS: I second.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Seconded by Mr. Ralph Rivers. Now, Mr. McNees, you move that the resolution be amended in order that a copy might go to each Congressman and each Senator?

McNEES: That is correct, Mr. President.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. McNees moves and asks unanimous consent that the proposed amendment to the motion be made. Is there objection? Hearing no objection it is so ordered, and the amendment to the motion has been made. The question is: "Shall the resolution be adopted?" Mr. Coghill had asked unanimous consent. Is there objection? Hearing no objection it is so ordered and the resolution has been adopted. Will the Chief Clerk please read the second resolution?

(The Chief Clerk then read the resolution by the Committee

on Administration, entitled, "Alaska Statehood Committee.")

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Coghill.

COGHILL: Mr. President, I move and ask unanimous consent that the rules be suspended and this resolution be adopted.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Coghill moves and asks unanimous consent that the resolution be adopted. Is there objection? Hearing no objection, it is so ordered. Will the Chief Clerk please read the third resolution?

(The Chief Clerk read the resolution by the Committee on

Administration thanking Mr. Chalres (Charles) R. Griffin for donating pens to the delegates.)

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Coghill.

COGHILL: Mr. President, I move and ask unanimous consent that the rules be suspended and this resolution be adopted.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Coghill moves and asks unanimous consent that the resolution be adopted. Is there objection?

R. RIVERS: I object for the moment.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Ralph Rivers.

R. RIVERS: That resolution suggests that we did use the pencils to sign the constitution. They were never so used. May we hear it read again?

PRESIDENT EGAN: Would the Chief Clerk please read the resolution again?

(The Chief Clerk then read the resolution again.)

R. RIVERS: Why don't we just say "for use by the delegates"?

PRESIDENT EGAN: Aren't they talking about these. Mr. Ralph Rivers?

R. RIVERS: Oh, I was thinking about the others. I withdraw.

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Convention will be at recess for one minute.

RECESS

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Style and Drafting Committee are going to go over all of these resolutions that the Administration Committee has introduced and see if they can pick up any objections at that time on intent.

R. RIVERS: Mr. President, I apologize. I was referring to the ballpoint pens which Mr. Griffin also gave us, so I withdraw my objection.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Incidentally, that is what the resolution refers to, but Style and Drafting could make the necessary changes if it is satisfactory. If there is no objection, the resolution is ordered adopted. The Chief Clerk will please read the fourth resolution.

CHIEF CLERK: No, there were just the three. I have those telegrams though.

PRESIDENT EGAN: If there is no objection, the resolutions will be referred to the Style and Drafting Committee. The Chief Clerk may read the communications that are before us at this time.

(The Chief Clerk then read telegrams from the City of

Seward, and from Bill and Anna May Vokacek, Kodiak.)

PRESIDENT EGAN: The communications will be filed. Is there anything else to come before the Convention at this time? Mr. Hilscher?

HILSCHER: Mr. Earl Wyman of Wyman Studios has presented this to the Convention, and we can substitute the signed photograph and this can be presented to the University from the Convention if the Convention so desires.

PRESIDENT EGAN: What is the pleasure of the Convention as to how this will be presented to the University? And another problem we might have, in case the Chair might forget it, is do you think we should have Dr. Patty in tomorrow morning, to be sure that he is here, and present this gavel to the University?

HILSCHER: That would be a good idea.

TAYLOR: He will be here tonight for the dinner.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Well, it might be that the morning session would be more proper. Mr. McCutcheon?

McCUTCHEON: Mr. President, inasmuch as we have signed a copy of that same print for the University, it would appear to me that it might be advisable that this particular picture be presented to the Territorial Museum.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Hilscher.

HILSCHER: Mr. President, Mr. Wyman knew that we were having one signed by all of them, and he is perfectly willing to transfer the two pictures so that we will have a signed copy to present to the University.

PRESIDENT EGAN: When do you wish to have this accomplished, tonight or at the morning session? What is the pleasure of the Convention as to how to present these items to the University? Miss Awes.

AWES: I think it will be better to do it in the morning and then the picture will be transferred. I don't think it will be a good idea to do it at the dinner tonight because then it won't be on the record.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Doogan.

DOOGAN: I move and ask unanimous consent that we give Mr. Wyman a vote of thanks for his donation.

PRESIDENT EGAN: If there is no objection, it is so ordered. (Applause) Is there anything else to come before the Convention at this time? Mr. Coghill.

COGHILL: Mr. President, we do have another resolution that was introduced by the Committee on Administration yesterday, and it was left in second reading, and we could bring that up before the Convention at this time.

PRESIDENT EGAN: That is correct, Mr. Coghill, and we still have another hour before we would be obligated to go to the dinner, so if it is the pleasure of the Convention that we consider that resolution in second reading at this time, we can have it brought before us. Is there objection to bringing that administrative resolution before us at this time? The Convention will be at recess while the Chief Clerk has the copies placed on the desks.

RECESS

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Convention will come to order. Mr. Marston.

MARSTON: If we have a little time here, I have a souvenir I think everybody would like to have, and to fill in time I could tell the story of that jade lamp and give you a souvenir of it. I have 55 pieces here. If you have a little time I will tell you about that jade lamp?

PRESIDENT EGAN: If there is no objection, Mr. Marston, you may proceed to tell us about the lamp.

MARSTON: In 1941 I arrived in the Arctic, and I met Tom [last name inaudible]. He's been a trader for half a century in the Kobuk River valley, he had a long curly white hair down to his shoulders, a delightful character, he had an Eskimo family. He lived at Kotzebue then. He told me about an Eskimo who was going to make the finest jade lamp ever made. This Eskimo, according to legend -- the legend was 250 years old -- and it was a real legend because they produced the lamp. This Eskimo said, "I'm going to make the finest lamp ever made," and he went away from his village about 75 miles -- I figure it was Kiana -- Jade Mountain is about 75 miles from Kiana -- and he got a 75-pound jade nugget and started back home. It was kind of awkward, and he went back and got another 75-pound piece, made a basket of willow roots and hung over his shoulder, one nugget in front and one behind so they swung freely, and he walked back to his village and he carved this jade lamp. Then when he died, as the custom was, the lamp went on his grave. It became a shrine, and the Eskimos, as they were going by in the wintertime would throw it a ptarmigan, those going by in the summer would throw it a fish, and this story persisted for 250 years, and Tom had heard this story over and over again. Then an Eskimo said, "I know he knew where the lamp is." Tom said "I'll give you 100 pounds of flour if you'll get it." In the course of months this Eskimo came in with that lamp, and Tom sent word to [name inaudible] of the Smithsonian Institute, and in a couple of years he showed up. He made the remark, "It's too young." Tom said, "I was a little discouraged and the man wanted a piece of jade and I just broke a piece off and gave it to him, and I gave away this piece, and in my big storehouse I'll find you a piece." I told him, "I don't want a piece. It was a great story, you shouldn't have done it, Tom." He said, "I know, I made a mistake, I should have kept it." Two hundred and fifty years that story lasted and lived and proved to be true, and I couldn't get a piece of jade from that lamp, so I said, "I'll make myself a jade lamp." This took 12 years and it was finished just yesterday. I didn't know where Jade Mountain was, a mythical mountain there, but Eskimos told me the general area and finally I went to Jade Mountain about the year '42, and I went up Jade Creek up to Jade Mountain and I found a piece of jade that looked like about 100 pounds. Now, I don't want to brag, but I broke all records -- Harvard and Yale records -- in the leg and back lift. I had a straight board packsack and I got in in and I could hardly get it up. I finally got it up on my back and hiked back down to Lloyd's place on Dall Creek -- old man Lloyd -- and I put this down on the old bench, and he had a fish cooked for me. Then I started on back to the village of Kobuk with this jade nugget in my packsack. Then the bridge broke down, the log bridge. I didn't yet know what was wrong. I knew I was getting along to where it was rather tough going, and I thought maybe I was beginning to lose a little of that strength I had, and it wasn't a very happy feeling. Then the screws on that straight board packsack pulled loose, and I had to let it down on the low flat tundra land, and I put it on a hump of ground. I reset the screws, and then I couldn't get that thing back. I began to suspect I was really losing my strength, and I wasn't happy, but I said, "Buddy, you and me is buddies and you go with me or I'll stay with you." I lay down in the late spring sunshine and took a sleep, and then said, "Come on, let's get the hell out of here," and I couldn't get it up. It wouldn't come, so I was still stubborn, and I put the shoulder straps over a little on my back and then I fiddled it off the hummock and it pushed me down in the tundra. I couldn't hardly breathe. I said this is a blankety place to get into on your own doings, but I talked myself up, and I made tracks down over the frozen ground. I was discouraged and despondent, just like we get on statehood sometimes. I was pretty well washed up, and it is no fun to think that at that time of life your strength is gone. So I moved on and I rested by a tree -- I got down where the tree line began a little above timberline -- and I finally arrived discouraged and despondent and pretty well given up, whipped by strength at that time of life that was gone, I thought. I came into the Harry Brown's trading post at Kobuk Village, I put it on the scales, and it weighed 164 pounds. I've got good legs yet and a good back; I'm all right. So, be of good cheer, we will be a state not too long hence. I have a feeling we're going to make it within the next two years or less, and the man from Grand Rapids encouraged me very much. Now, I have a souvenir that took 12 years to make. It is made of pure silver and gold and jade, and it was finished just yesterday -- the man stayed up all night -- Ted [last name inaudible] that lives up in the Kobuk River country. He and [name inaudible] have been prospecting for 22 years. They're a couple of bachelors, too. Sid cut this out by a water-driven saw. When I brought that nugget out, the jade [business] boomed up there. Everybody knew where Jade Mountain was; it is a business nowadays. Half of those people up there are carving jade now -- some of those people are doing nothing but that. We have Eskimos and white men making a living out of carving jade, and it's very interesting how business was started. This jade nugget I brought out, a war correspondent wrote the story and the business started. It's still going on. I have this nugget here to give you each a souvenir. How shall we distribute this, Mr. President?

PRESIDENT EGAN: I've got mine.

MARSTON: You have got yours, have you? This is good jade and there are 50 or more pieces there. Take one apiece. I'm happy to have this lamp here. I think it makes the lamp really valuable that I could bring it here today.

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Convention will be at ease while these pieces of jade are being distributed.

RECESS

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Convention will come to order. We have before us this resolution from the Committee on Administration. It has already been read. Its adoption has been moved. Are there amendments to be offered for the resolution? Mr. Victor Rivers, did you have an amendment to offer yesterday?

V. RIVERS: I relinquish to Mr. Burke Riley of the Rules Committee who has an amendment which will cover the point we talked about.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Riley.

RILEY: Mr. President, this has nothing to do with the Rules Committee, but I'll be glad to make the suggestion. The amendment that a few of us have discussed is that Sections 1 and 2 be stricken and in lieu there be inserted: "The President of the Convention, with such assistance as he may require from among the delegates or the staff of the Convention be authorized to conclude the unfinished business of the Convention, and to expend such funds from the authorized appropriation as may be necessary to complete the work of and carry out the purposes of the Convention." We think that would give wider latitude to the President to meet a situation which will occur as the members start to disperse around the Territory, and that full coverage may be had without spelling the matter out so rigidly. It might be more conveniently and efficiently handled. Now, another suggestion while I'm putting these on the floor is that in paragraph (d), page 2 of Section 3, the third word, "two" be stricken, in other words, just an authorization to arrange for copies, such number of copies as may seem desirable. I regret that we haven't had this in time to have copies distributed. Oh yes, another one on page 2 of paragraph (d) would be the addition after the word "type" of the two words "and mimeographed", striking the semicolon after "type" and inserting it after "mimeographed." I ask unanimous consent. Mr. President, for the adoption of those amendments.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Would the Chief Clerk please read the proposed amendments back to the Convention?

(The Chief Clerk then read the amendments as proposed by

Mr. Riley.)

PRESIDENT EGAN: Does everyone have that proposed amendment? The Chief Clerk will please slowly read the proposed amendment.

(The Chief Clerk read the amendments again.)

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Riley, what is your pleasure? Did you move the adoption of the amendment?

RILEY: I move the adoption and I ask unanimous consent, Mr. President.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Unanimous consent is asked. Is there objection?

LONDBORG: I object.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Objection is heard. Is there a second to the motion?

WHITE: I'll second the motion.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Seconded by Mr. White. The question is open for discussion. Mr. Coghill.

COGHILL: Could we have a one-minute recess?

PRESIDENT EGAN: If there is no objection, the Convention will be at recess for one minute.

RECESS

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Convention will come to order. It has been moved and seconded that -- Mr. Londborg said he removed his objection -- it has been moved and seconded that the amendment be adopted. The question is: "Shall the proposed amendment be adopted?" All those in favor of adopting the amendment will signify by saying "Aye". All opposed, by saying "No". The "Ayes have it and the amendment is adopted. Mr. Hilscher.

HILSCHER: Mr. President, I should like to rise for a point of information. Our work is now drawing to a close. We are going to scatter commencing tomorrow. We probably never will meet again as an entire body. We have a terrific job to do between now and April 24 --

BUCKALEW: Excuse me, Mr. President, point of order. He got the floor for information. Let him ask his question and sit down.

HILSCHER: If Mr. Buckalew will hold his breath for 30 seconds, I'll ask my question. My question is this, Mr. Buckalew, what is going to be done between now and April 24 to sell the Constitution and to get a large vote out for ratification? That is my question.

PRESlDENT EGAN: Mr. Riley.

RILEY: Mr. President, I believe this resolution has come before us in the amendment process?

PRESIDENT EGAN: That amendment was adopted. The resolution is still before us, that is correct, Mr. Riley.

RILEY: For other amendments I'll defer to Mr. Fischer at this point.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Fischer.

V. FISCHER: Mr. President, I move that Section old number 3 [new Section 2] be amended to read as follows, the first paragraph before the colon: "That the President of the Convention, or a person designated by him, shall carry out the following duties:". The purpose of the amendment is -- as everybody knows, our Secretary will be leaving shortly. Some of the items covered here will have to be carried on after his termination date, and the duties will have to be taken care of by someone else, and so we should not just state "secretary" here. I discussed this with Mr. Coghill previously. I ask unanimous consent for the adoption of the amendment.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Fischer moves and asks unanimous consent for the adoption of the amendment. Is there objection? Is there objection to the unanimous consent request? Hearing none the amendment is ordered adopted. Are there other amendments for the resolution? Mr. Riley.

RILEY: Mr. President, I had earlier indicated on page 2, subsection (d) that the third word of subsection (d) be deleted. That word is "two", and that on the following line the semicolon be stricken, the words "and mimeographed" inserted at that point, followed by a semicolon. I ask unanimous consent for the adoption of that amendment to subsection (d).

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Riley moves and asks unanimous consent for the adoption of the amendment. Mr. Sundborg.

SUNDBORG: I object temporarily just to ask a question.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Objection is heard.

SUNDBORG: By the term "the proceedings," is it intended to mean the verbatim record of everything that was said here throughout the 75 days we have been meeting, Mr. Coghill? Excuse me, Mr. President, may I ask Mr. Coghill a question?

PRESIDENT EGAN: You may ask Mr. Coghill a question, Mr. Sundborg.

COGHILL: The arrangement for the two copies -- yes, it was -- for the verbatim copy of the stenotype and those two copies would be kept on file so that the Statehood Committee or the next legislature could make a revised verbatim journal if they so wished. That was the purpose of the two copies. Right now, under our rules, the stenotypist is making two copies.

SUNDBORG: Mr. President, may I ask Mr. Riley a question?

PRESIDENT EGAN: You may.

SUNDBORG: Mr. Riley, was it your understanding when you were suggesting that the copies be mimeographed that it was referring to the verbatim record which I think will run into thousands and thousands of pages?

RILEY: I should perhaps relay that question to the gentleman on my left. The thought was that if they were being typed perhaps they could be typed on stencils, but if the process is already well along on a two-copy basis -- this was simply referred to me to submit -- if she is well along already on two copies, speaking for myself, I would withdraw the amendment.

PRESIDENT EGAN: If there is no objection the Convention will be at recess for two minutes.

RECESS

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Convention will come to order. Mr. Riley.

RILEY: Mr. President, simply for the sake of putting the matter on the floor and objection having been heard, I will move the adoption of the amendment.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Will the Chief Clerk please read the proposed amendment. Is there a second to the motion?

KNIGHT: I'll second the motion.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Seconded by Mr. Knight. Will the Chief Clerk read it?

CHIEF CLERK: "Subsection (d) of Section 2 on page 2: delete the word 'two' on the first line and insert the words 'and mimeographed' after the word 'typed' on the second line."

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Coghill.

COGHILL: Mr. President, this part of the resolution was more or less for the orderly handling of the tape recording and of the journal kept by the stenotypist, or the verbatim record kept by the stenotypist, and in the rules we have two copies. She made -- in transposing her notes she had a carbon copy which she was to keep and the only thing that this section (d) brings out is that these two copies, and the tape recordings will be in the files of the Convention documents -- including the Journals -- will be deposited with the Secretary of Alaska to be turned over to the secretary of state when we become a state. There is nothing restrictive in this that the Statehood Committee or the legislature could take these records and have a revised journal made out of them and distributed to the delegates or to anyone that is interested. I believe that the motive behind the amendment was so that there would be a full proceeding of the Convention in the hands of each one of the delegates, but it might turn into quite a large package of paper by the time it would be done. I don't think that section (d) restricts anything such as what is trying to be brought out by this amendment.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Riley.

RILEY: Mr. President, it is up to me to close, after the matter is clarified for me, I could not support the amendment.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Do you ask then that the amendment be withdrawn. Mr. Riley?

RILEY: I'm simply going to vote against it, Mr. President, on the basis of cost.

PRESIDENT EGAN: The question is, "Shall the amendment be adopted?" All those in favor of adopting the amendment will signify by saying "Aye". All opposed by saying "No". The "Noes" have it and the amendment has failed of adoption. Are there other amendments? Mr. Johnson.

JOHNSON: Mr. President, I do not have an amendment, but in paragraph (c), it refers to the fact that 5,000 copies are to be printed and distributed. I should like to suggest that at least ten copies be sent to each delegate.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Johnson suggests that at least ten copies be sent to each delegate. Do you offer that as a unanimous consent request?

JOHNSON: If necessary, I'll offer it as a motion.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Is there objection if the President and those who are responsible for this send ten copies of the Constitution to each delegate, whether they request it or not? If there is no objection then, it will be the understanding that at least ten copies will be distributed. Are there other amendments to be proposed for the resolution? Mr. White.

WHITE: Mr. President, some delegates seem to feel that under section (c), 5,000 copies conceivably may turn out not to be enough, so I move and ask unanimous consent that just prior to the number "5,000" that the words "at least" be inserted.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. White moves and asks unanimous consent that just before the figure "5,000" appears that the words "at least" be inserted. Mr. White asks unanimous consent for the adoption of the amendment. Is there objection? Mr. Hurley.

HURLEY: Just to ask a question. [Question inaudible] (Laughter)

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Convention will come to order. Mr. White.

WHITE: Mr. President, I didn't see this extra sentence, so I'll withdraw my amendment.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. White withdraws his unanimous consent request. Are there other proposed amendments for the resolution? It will be sent -- if it was adopted -- to the Style and Drafting Committee and if any other changes were needed they could be made there to comply with amendments that have been made. Mr. Sundborg.

SUNDBORG: May I address a question to Mr. Coghill?

PRESIDENT EGAN: You may, Mr. Sundborg.

SUNDBORG: Mr. Coghill, referring to section (b), it mentions that facsimile copies are to be distributed as directed by the Committee on Administration. Is that the 40 facsimile copies which are identical with the ones we signed except that the signatures have been printed in instead of signed?

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Coghill.

COGHILL: Yes, that is correct.

SUNDBORG: Mr. Coghill, will your Committee indicate to the Convention what type of distribution it plans with those?

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Coghill.

COGHILL: Mrs. Sweeney has the notes on that.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mrs. Sweeney.

SWEENEY: The notes of the meeting indicate that this was to be taken up by the President of the Convention, the Secretary of the Convention, and the Chairman. of the Administration Committee, and the feeling was that before any actual distribution was made that word would reach these three as to where some of the delegates desired that they should go. It was mentioned on the floor that the judges should have them, that was considered, and some of the schools and things like that, but no final and actual disposition was made.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Coghill.

COGHILL: Mr. President, if it will do any good, possibly we can get together this evening and we can bring it on the floor and report it out tomorrow morning.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Sundborg.

SUNDBORG: I would certainly appreciate that very much, Mr. President. For instance, I think we will find that 40 copies are not too many by any means. I want to be sure that Delegate Bartlett will get one, and Governor Heintzleman will get one, and some of the others, and that we don't overlook people.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Where does it call for 40 copies, Mr. Sundborg?

COGHILL: Mr. President, we have 100 copies of the large size ones.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Smith.

SMITH: Mr. President, may I ask a question of Mr. Coghill?

PRESIDENT EGAN: If there is no objection, Mr. Smith.

SMITH: Mr. Coghill, in the second sentence in subparagraph (c) on page 2, the words "and of an explanatory summary thereof" -- what will that "explanatory summary" consist of and who will prepare this "explanatory summary"?

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Coghill, can you explain that?

COGHILL: Mr. President, the experts are working on that now. They are working on a summary of the Constitution as written. and that should be ready by tomorrow and, if not, it will be mailed to each one of the delegates along with the rest of the Journals and papers that are being reproduced by the Convention after we are adjourned.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Are there other amendments to be proposed to the resolution? Mr. Fischer.

V. FISCHER: Mr. President, I have not as yet any amendment. I have a question in mind as to the propriety of the last part of subsection (c). I have nothing against the Chairman of the Committee on Administration; however, what we are doing here is making a broad delegation to the President. I just wonder whether the Chairman of the Committee could have a veto power on the President?

COGHILL: No, Mr. President, I think that Style and Drafting would take care of that, but it was set up as you know in the first part of the resolution that the powers would be delegated to the Chairman of Administration, the President, and under him would be the Chairman of Administration and the Secretary. Now, with those two sections knocked out, Style and Drafting would have to take that out, also.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. McLaughlin.

McLAUGHLIN: Mr. President, I rise to protest. This instruction is an interoffice memo, nothing else and they are prepared to send it in to Style and Drafting to be reworded. Frankly, if it is directive merely to the President of the Convention, I think if it is bad English, he should let it ride as it is, because the next thing we'll be doing, we will be requiring Style and Drafting to edit the speeches on the floor. This is an interoffice memo and I don't want to establish the unnecessary precedent that this be referred to Style and Drafting.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mrs. Hermann.

HERMANN: Mr. President, I do want to say that I am deeply touched with the great amount of confidence the Convention has suddenly developed in Style and Drafting. (Laughter)

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Convention will come to order. Mr. Hinckel.

HINCKEL: In section (c) where it says "explanatory summary thereof" -- I question the wisdom of having somebody interpret the Constitution for us and to publish the interpretation for wide distribution. I am not too sure that that is a wise thing to do.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Armstrong.

ARMSTRONG: Mr. President, some time ago I was trying to think through what the problem would be of selling the Constitution to the people of Alaska. In looking through some of the journals of other constitutions, particularly the one of New Jersey, I found that they had over a million copies of the constitution printed and 600,000 summaries. The summaries were used in discussion groups, in PTA's, and civic organizations. It was used as a handbook for an intelligent understanding of the constitution. You read the summary, then you could go to the constitution, and you were able to interpret the motives and the procedure. This is something that is done in almost every printing of a constitution, to have a supplemental handbook. I'm told by our friend from New Jersey, Mr. Bebout, that the summaries have almost disappeared from New Jersey because they were so popular, and they are on the fringe of having to have some reprints because it has become such an interesting and helpful tool in understanding the constitution. Now, that is just part of the history of it.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Hinckel.

HINCKEL: I'm not questioning the advisability of having the summary printed or of having something to go along with it, but I think that we should delegate some group or check into it very thoroughly before we have it printed. I just don't like the idea of telling our advisory staff and just saying "you write up a summary and we'll send it out" and distribute it all over the country. Their interpretation might not be the exact interpretation of the body. They weren't here all the time and I think that somebody -- a committee of the membership -- should review it before they print it. That is just my personal opinion, but I just don't feel too sure that we should do this without knowing exactly what we are doing and with the consent of the body.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Victor Rivers.

V. RIVERS: Mr. President, this resolution gives the authority to the President and the Secretary to review this work as I visualize it. Also, this summary is a popular version of the contents of our constitution, and if we don't have such a summary, I can readily realize that there will be a great many such summaries made and there will be a lot of guesswork done by those who do not have such a summary available. I, for one, would much rather see us have prepared under the auspices of our officers such a summary for wide distribution so that everybody will be clearly informed as to what the contents cover and what they actually mean. This popular version I think would be one of the biggest assets we could have in helping sell the Constitution, through the schools and into the private residences of the private citizens. I think it would have a great deal, probably more readability and interest than would the bare document itself. I would very much favor our keeping this summary idea in this resolution.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Victor Fischer.

V. FISCHER: I would have to agree with Mr. McLaughlin that there is no need to move this resolution through Style and Drafting, and therefore, I move that in subsection (c) that a period be placed after the word "printed" and that the rest of the sentence be struck, and I ask unanimous consent.

UNIDENTIFIED DELEGATE: Let's have that again.

(Mr. Fischer repeated the amendment.)

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Fischer asks unanimous consent for the adoption of the amendment. Is there objection? Hearing no objection it is so ordered. Are there other amendments to the resolution? Mr. Coghill.

COGHILL: Mr. President, if there are no further amendments, I move that this resolution be adopted and ask unanimous consent.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Coghill moves that this resolution be adopted. Is there objection? Hearing no objection, it is so ordered and the resolution is adopted. Mr. Marston.

MARSTON: Mr. President, I just received word from Dr. Patty that we should be upstairs in ten minutes.

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Chair will entertain a motion for recess. Mr. McNees.

McNEES: Prior to the motion for recess, Mr. President, may I call the following delegates' attention to the fact there is a note in their mailbox: Armstrong, Awes, Boswell, Buckalew, Cooper, Cross, Davis, Egan, Gray, Hellenthal, Hilscher, King, Laws, McLaughlin, McNealy, Marston, Nordale, Peratrovich, Poulsen, Reader, Riley, Rosswog, Sundborg, Taylor, and Walsh.

PRESIDENT EGAN: What was that, Mr. McNees? There is a note in the mailbox?

McNEES: There is a note in their mailbox that I would like to have them pick up.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Hellenthal.

HELLENTHAL: Mr. President, have any of the staff expressed a desire as to what time they wish the membership to return tomorrow morning or afternoon?

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Hellenthal, it is the feeling of the Chair that we can't return tomorrow afternoon -- but it is the feeling of the Chair that we should attempt to convene at 8:00 a.m. in order to be sure, as the Chair understands it, the Chamber of Commerce has something they want to do out here and to be absolutely certain that we are finished by 10:00 a.m. That is just a suggestion. Mr. Johnson.

JOHNSON: Mr. President, in that event, I move that the Convention adjourn --

PRESIDENT EGAN: Recess.

JOHNSON: Recess until tomorrow morning at 8:00 o'clock.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Johnson moves and asks unanimous consent -- before we put the question, though, the question has been asked by the bus company as to what the desire of the delegates will be as to bus transportation this evening. Dr. Patty has informed Mr. Stewart that he felt that we might be through upstairs by 9:00. It might be that if the bus was here at 9:30 it might be about that time. In the morning there is a 7:30 regular bus, but that would not be big enough.

COGHILL: We will have a bus in front of the Nordale Hotel at 7:30 in the morning to pick up the delegates. I would like to announce that, if we are going to convene at 8:00 in the morning, I would like to have a Committee on Administration meeting at 7:00 in the morning.

PRESIDENT EGAN: The Convention will come to order.

COGHILL: There will be transportation to pick them up at the Nordale Hotel at that time.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Johnson moves and asks unanimous consent that the Convention stand at recess until 8:00 a.m. Mr. Fischer.

V. FISCHER: May I ask Mr. Johnson a question?

PRESIDENT EGAN: If there is no objection, Mr. Fischer.

V. FISCHER: Would you not think that it might be better to get together for an hour tonight and not get up at 6:00 in the morning?

JOHNSON: I'm following the suggestion of the President.

PRESIDENT EGAN: Mr. Fischer, the thing is that the Chamber of Commerce would like to come out here in the morning, and so, under those circumstances, the Chair felt that something might come up that might take time. Mr. Hellenthal.

HELLENTHAL: Mr. President, would they advise coming with a full or an empty stomach?

PRESIDENT EGAN: The question is: "Shall the Convention stand at recess until 8:00 a.m. tomorrow?" All those in favor will signify by saying "Aye". All opposed, by saying "No". The "Ayes" have it and the Convention stands at recess.